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The Column of Constantine Square Landscaping Project


absmiddle Yazdır   -A | A+ 12.04.2016
6,950.00 m² area surrounding the historic Column of Constantine situated on Bab-ı Ali Street in Molla Fenari neighborhood is being conceptualized as a project to serve as a square.

6,950.00 m² area surrounding the historic Column of Constantine situated on Bab-ı Ali Street in Molla Fenari neighborhood is being conceptualized as a project to serve as a square.

The Column of Constantine project, one of the important locations of Istanbul and Fatih and situated on a dense circulation area of domestic and foreign tourists, is now in design state and it is aimed to create a prestigious square project worthy of the area.



On The Column of Constantine

The Column of Constantine is a column on one of the seven hills in Istanbul, on the district which is called Çemberlitaş today, which was built in honor of Emperor Constantine the Great in 330 A.D.

The column consists of 8 rings connected to each other each in 3 tons and with a diameter of 3 meters and with a pedestal as a base superposed.

History

Emperor of Byzantine, Constantine had this 57 m column dismantled from Apollon temple in Rome and erected it on its present place, a square called Forum Constantine.

When it was first built, there was an Apollon statue saluting the sun on top of the column.  When it was brought to Istanbul in 330, Emperor Constantine had his statue erected on top of the structure. Byzantine emperors Julianus’ and Theodosius’ statues were also put on the structure afterwards.

The column suffered from fire and damage when a lightning struck it in 1081 and the statue on it fell down. Alexios I Komnenos had the statue repaired and put a cross on it on a head with a pedestal.

After the conquest of Istanbul in 1453, the cross was laid low and the Column of Constantinople was renovated for the first time after 1470s by Yavuz Sultan Selim. Apollon column saw a big fire in Ottoman Period and its marbles were damaged. Sultan Mustafa II (1695-1704) had it reinforced with a wall beneath the statue and wrapped with iron rings. Ever since that day, it has been called Çemberlitaş for this reason.

Though it is not proven to be accurate, it is said that there are some objects buried below the statue taken from the grave of Prophet Jesus which is assumed to be in Jerusalem.